A Private School offering Classes to Students who Desire Academic Excellence

 

 

 

2010 Course Catalog

Part time students pay individul class fees, class fees are included in tuition for full time students

All students pay lab fees

Full time students have priority on enrolling in all classes

 

English Department Fine Arts Department
Math Department Electives Department
Science Department Sports and Fitness
Social Studies Department Clubs and Teams
World Languages Mini Sessions

     



English Department

Jr. High Introduction to Literature: Mythology, Fables, Folklore and Legends in Literature (Jr. Lit - Mythology - 1st semester

Jr. High Introduction to Literature: Science Fiction and The Future (Jr. Lit - SciFi) – 2nd semester

(6th-8th); Brooke Collins Hamilton Thursday 11-12:30 ($325)

This course focuses on learning to read critically, asking smart questions and answering the difficult ones! Inference, interpretation and analysis are key to our students’ initial work in deconstructing literature. First semester explores universal themes, characters and motifs and symbols in the Bible, ancient myths, European fables and American Folklore. Readings include works about Frogs, Green Knights, the Jabberwocky, talking rabbits and Angels. Selected readings from Kipling, Thurber, Carroll, Twain, Poe, Orwell, and Harris. Second semester will focus on Science Fiction, the Future and Fantasy. Students will be introduced to the elements of literature through the analysis of works by Tove Jansson, Madeleine L'Engle, David Selznik, Norton Juster,  HG Wells, Lois Lowery,  Rod Sterling, and KurtVonnegut


23.062 The Hero in Literature (Sr. Lit - Hero)

(9th -11th); Karen Howes Full year course. Friday 10:00-11:15 ($325/ semester)

From Oedipus, King of Thebes, to a Fireman who turns against his government, the literary hero stands out to the reader as extraordinary. What makes a character a hero? What differentiates an Anti-hero from a villain? The goal of this class is to create a discussion atmosphere that is much like an investigation which teaches the students to probe their readings, develop theories about stories and characters, and learn how to find evidence within a story to support their ideas. Skills covered include identifying imagery, figurative language, symbols and motifs, interpreting an author’s intent, analyzing style and theme, understanding fiction in the context of a time period and culture, and collaborating with peers to work on projects and presentations.
Readings include  Oedipus Rex, Antigone, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Lord of the Flies, Gulliver’s Travels, Fahrenheit 451, Slaughterhouse five, the graphic novel Watchmen and two contemporary works.  We will also study film scripts from the following: Les Miserables, V for Vendetta, and Batman/Dark Knight. 


23.051 American Literature (Sr. Lit - American)

(10th-12th);Leah Hughes Full year; Thursday 11:00-12:30 ($325/semester)

This is a survey class in American Literature from the colonial period in the 1400s to the beat poets in the 1970s. Genres covered include  short stories, autobiographies, non-fiction essays, poetry, plays, and novels. Readings include  Huckleberry Finn, The Scarlet Letter, To Kill a Mockingbird, The Great Gatsby, A Raisin in the Sun, The Crucible,  All the Pretty Horses, and The Beloved. Poets include Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Poe, Longfellow, Eliot, Cummings, and others.

 23.052 British Literature -  From Paradise Lost to Pink Floyd (Sr. Lit - British Poetry)

(10th-12th); Dr Allison Umminger, 2nd semester:  Monday 11:00-12:00 and Wednesday 9:30-10:30 ($350)


Only time separates the British poets of old and their Rock ‘n Roll contemporaries. Most of today’s greatest lyrics came out of an English heritage steeped in metaphysical poetry, British romanticism, old English hymnals and Elizabethean madrigals. Led Zepplin, Queen,  Sting, The Rolling Stones, The Beatles, and Pink Floyd  are just a few 20th century bands we will study in order to enrich our understanding of the works of Milton, Morely, Wordsworth, Chaucer, Browning and Donne. This class will explore the ways in which poetry works, and how it appeals to our intelligence, awakens our senses, and plays to our imagination. Our study focuses on close readings by looking at the power of language, and the use of rhyme, rhythm, meter, symbolism, and imagery.

23.052 British Literature – Survey from Beowulf to Frankenstein (Sr. Lit - British)

(10th-12th); Trella Walker, 1st semester; Wednesdays 10:30-12:00 ($325)

This course takes a hybrid approach to the study of literature through a chronological and thematic focus on important works by English authors. Students will learn about the following literary periods: Olde English, Middle Ages, Elizabethean, Rennaissance and Restoration. Readings will include Beowulf, Chaucer, Milton, Jonathon Swift, Alexander Pope, and Mary Shelly. Primary text is the Norton Anthology of English Literature.

23.052 British Literature – Survey  from the Romantics to Modern  (Sr. Lit - British)

(10th-12th); Trella Walker, 2nd semester; Wednesdays 10:30-12:00 ($325)

Close reading of English writings from the following eras: Romantic, Gothic, Victorian, and Modern. Students will study authors and works in context with political, cultural, scientific, and religious movements. Readings will include works by the Brontes, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Bram Stoker, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, Joseph Conrad, and Virginia Woolf
   

23.066 Contemporary Literature - Dramatic Literature (Sr. Lit - Dramatic)

(advanced 10th-12th and permission of instructor); Karen Howes Not offered this year

This course recognizes the special nature of drama as both a literary text and as a performing art. We will delve into several great plays which have set the stage for contemporary theater. This is a must for serious acting students. We will analyze works by Ibsen, Williams, Beckett, Chekov, O’Neil, Mamet and others. No final exam, but there will be a final written project in which students may either write a one-act play or turn in a five page analysis of a contemporary play. This course fills the State’s contemporary literature credit.

23.023 British Literature: Shakespeare (Sr. Lit - Shakespeare)

10th-12th: Brooke Collins Hamilton 1st semester; Monday  9:30-10:30 and Wednesday 9:30-10:30 ($325)

This one semester course fills one-half credit hour of British/World Literature. Aside from reading 4-5 of Shakespeare’s most famous plays, students will see several films and read sonnets. This class will discuss criticism surrounding Shakespeare’s work and life and analyze the historical, social, and religious context in which the plays were written.  Students will be required to keep pace with the reading and homework assignments. There will be an element of performance incorporated into our studies in which students will act, direct and sometimes re-write specific scenes. This class requires close reading and deep thinking. Plays sample each of the four Shakespearean genres and will likely include Hamlet, Henry V, Much Ado about Nothing, and The Tempest.


Jr. High Non-fiction Writing 1: Essays, Memoirs and Journalism (Junior Writing NonFiction)

(6th-8th);  Trella Walker, 1st semester on Tuesday from 9-10 and 10-11; 2nd semester on Friday 11:15-12:30 ($300)

Everyone has ideas, opinions and experiences to share.   Writing is the art of putting those ideas and experiences on paper.   This class will help students develop their confidence as writers while they hone their writing skills.  Studentl explore different writing genres in expository writing – personal narratives, essays, journalism,  and other non-fiction works. The class focuses on  the characteristics of effective writing (including grammar, structure, style and organization which all combine to help us communicate better).  Students are expected to write weekly and  encouraged to prepare at least one piece of writing for publication.


Jr. High Introduction to Creative Writing 1 (Jr. Creative Writing)

(6th-8th); Karen Howes, 1st  semester on Friday 11:15-12:30 and 2nd semester on Tuesday from 10-11. ($300)

This class explores various forms of creative writing including the short story, the fictional memoir, script writing, fairy tales, tall tales, and poetry. There will be weekly writing activities and light reading. Students will identify and analyze several genres from a writer’s perspective in order to emulate different styles. Styles we study may include satire, horror, romance, science fiction, magical realism, fantasy and  coming-of-age. While creative by its nature, this class teaches students to organize their thoughts, be attentive to their reader, focus their plot points, develop their characters, and learn grammar.  We will incorporate figurative language (metaphor, simile, personification, alliteration, irony, etc.) and the elements of fiction (plot, theme, point of view, setting, character) into our creative works.


23.031 Writer's Workshop - Creative Writing (Sr. Creative Writing)

(9th-12th); Karen Howes, Thursday 1-2:30 ($325)

Verisimilitude is the focus of this course –  we will explore the elements that create the appearance of truth in writing. It is neither pure expression nor truth per se that we seek. This class aims to explore, practice and perfect writing techniques that enable readers to suspend disbelief while reading fictional prose. Students will begin the task of creating truth in their work through the use of detail, developing a point of view, and by being aware of the reader. This class covers basic skills required of fiction writing, including recognizing and using advanced sentence structure and the creative use of grammar.  This means we will study the rules in order to know how to break them. We will also spend a good deal of time developing  characters, setting, atmosphere/mood, and plot within the context of the world that we aim to create.  There will be weekly writing exercises and discussions surrounding published works of creative prose. Students are responsible for keeping a portfolio and writer’s journal. Semesters are independent of each other, but students in the first semester may continue to develop work throughout the second semester.


23.034 Advanced Composition (Sr. Adv Comp)

(10th-12th); Dr Allison Umminger, Not offered this semester ($325 per semester).

This semester long course focuses on different aspects of good writing.  We will begin the semester with learning to write personal essays and prep for the writing section of the SAT test.  Students will read personal essays by satirical authors, and learn about using their own "voice," which will enable them to write better college entrance essays.  We will then continue with some analytical writing, focusing on fairy tales in their original forms and revisions by Angela Carter.  As always, critical thinking as well as the mechanics of good writing will be stressed.  Finally, we will spend the last part of the semester working on a longer research project.  This, hopefully, will impart the limits, as well as benefits, of using the web for research. Emphasis is placed on collecting and citing  material from a breadth of sources.  The focus of the course is on drafting as much as on the "final product," as excellent writing stems from viewing writing as an ongoing engagement with materials.


23.031 Writer's Workshop - Writing: From Process to Publication (Sr. Writer's Workshop)

(9th-12th) Trella Walker and Karen Howes, Tuesday 1:00-2:00 (Section A) or Wednesday 12:30-1:30 (Section B) ($325 per semester)

This course covers all aspects of writing including academic writing, the personal essay, and the short story. The focus of this course is to develop skills for re-writing (not just editing).  Based on the fact that a C paper is an A paper turned in too soon, students will learn that the actual act of writing causes further discovery. It does not begin as a summation of an idea, a conclusion, or even a thesis. Writing is a process driven by an engagement with questions and problems. Students will be exposed to the process used by selected published authors and they will understand that the initial stages of writing are very much like thinking – messy and disorganized. This course is founded on the values of a true liberal arts education – learning how to think through a process of discovery and analysis, and developing the ability to express those thoughts to others.

Math Department

 Jr. High Foundations in Mathematics (Jr. Foundations in Math)

(6th-7th); Freya Fitzpatrick, Not offered this semester ($325 per semester)

An engaging and action packed class for students who desire more practice in arithmetic concepts involving fractions, percents, decimals, division and multiplication. Students will learn  how to think like a “mathematician” and develop the skills  needed prior to entering the Algebra series. Students will learn tricks of the trade, play logic games, be taught how to understand word problems, and  they will learn concrete ways of manipulating numbers in order to solve problems. 

Jr. High Pre-Algebra (Jr. PreAlgebra)

(6th-8th);  Lisa White, Full year; Tuesday and Thursday 2:30-3:30 ($325 per semester)

This class continues to build on arithmetic skills to prepare students for a rigorous Algebra I. The class stresses Math Logic skills and practice in computation. The Textbook for the math logic portion of the course is Harold Jacob's book Mathematics:  A Human Endeavor.  The text focuses on how to think as a mathematician and does not require math computational skills past elementary school arithmetic. The topics include number tricks and deductive reasoning, graphing the path of billiard balls, number sequences such as the Fibonacci sequence , functions and their graphs, large numbers and logarithms, polygons and symmetry.

27.061 Algebra I (Sr. Algebra I)

(8th-10th); Lisa White, Tuesday and Thursday 10-11 ($350). During the mini-session, this class meets on Fridays from 11:15-12:15.

This course is a college preparatory class using the Prentice Hall Algebra I textbook. Students in this course will be given homework for four days each week, which will involve studying the examples in the textbook as well as completing practice problems. In order to get the most out of the course, students will need to complete the assignments daily. Students will have access to the instructor via email if they run into difficulty completing the assignments. Students taking this course will study the following topics:  Variables, patterns, and graphs,  Real numbers, Solving equations, Solving inequalities, Graphs and functions, Linear equations and their graphs,  Systems of equations and inequalities, Exponents and exponential functions, Polynomials and factoring,
Quadratic equations and functions,  Radical expressions and equations, Rational equations and functions.

27.064 Algebra II (Sr. Algebra II)

(9th-12th); Lisa White, Tuesday 11:00-12:00 and Friday 9:45-11:15 ($350/semester). The Friday class runs through the mini-session.

Topics include linear functions, graphs, inequalities, systems of equations in three variables, matrices, quadratic functions, graphing polynomials, logarithmic functions, complex fractions, rational equations, parabolas, probability and statistics, trigonometric functions, law of cosines, and Double Angle formulas.

27.063 Geometry (Sr. Geometry)

(9th-12th); Derek Owens, Friday 11:15-12:45 ($350/semester) which runs through the mini session. An additional class meets on Tuesday from 11-12 ($100 per semester)

This course will cover the topics normally covered in a high school geometry course. This course is normally taken by students in grade nine or ten. Students should have completed Algebra 1 before enrolling in Geometry. The primary text used for this class is Geometry: Seeing, Doing, Understanding by Howard R. Jacobs, 3rd Edition, published by W. H. Freeman, 2003. The class emphasizes Euclidean geometry and explains the importance of logical reasoning and proof in mathematics. It has numerous practical and interesting examples and shows the many applications of geometry in the real world. It also touches on some important topics in analytic geometry (geometry in the coordinate plane). The course includes an algebra review so that students do not lose touch with their algebra skills;

27.067 Analysis/Pre Calculus (Sr. Analysis/PreCalculus)

(10th-12th); Derek Owens, Prerequisite: Algebra II
Friday 9:45-11:15 ($350/semester) and study lab on Tuesday from 11-12 ($100/semester)

Class time is primarily spent on instruction. The lecture notes are a key part of the class. These notes are prepared in advance and given to the students, but with much of the material deleted and replaced by blank space on the page. During the lecture, the students fill in the blank areas, solve the example problems, and add any notes they need for a complete understanding of the concepts introduced. By the end of the year, the students have a complete text made from the lectures delivered and the problems worked in class.

Topics covered include review of Algebra II, and Geometry,  inverse functions, synthetic division, graphing, logarithmic functions, mathematical models, radian and degree measure, Sinusoidal graphs, cotangent functions, Analytic trig, law of cosines, DeMoivre’s theorem, Plane curves and Parametric equations, Linear  Programming, sequences, induction, Binomial Theorem; Counting Principles; Permutations, Matrix Algebra; Partial Fraction Decomposition; Vectors; The Dot Product.

27.071 Calculus/AP Calculus (Sr. Calculus)

(10th-12th); Lina Ellis, Prerequisite:    PreCalculus,  Wednesday 9:30-10:30 and Friday 9:30-11:15 runs through the mini-session January term. ($350) 

This course is comparable to a one semester course in college Calculus. Students in this course will be given homework for the week which will include problems based on material from class, as well as reading assignments to best prepare for the following class. This course is a rigorous, college level mathematics course; students will have to remain diligent both inside and outside of class. While students will have e-mail access to the instructor between class sessions, it is greatly encouraged that they form study groups outside of class.  A firm understanding of algebraic concepts as well as knowledge of various functions and their behavior is required for this course.  Students interested in taking the AP exam will have additional prep time during the second semester.

Social Studies Department

World Affairs & Cultural Geography (Geography)

(7th-9th); Trella Walker, Full year; Tuesday 11-12:30 ($300 per semester)

This two semester course provide a study of the physical, political and economic geography of the world and applies the kowledge obtained to current world issues such as war, poverty and child labor based on a Model United Nations application study.  Students will be developping and utilizing skilss in oral presentations, research, writing and group project work. 


Jr. High Introduction to World History (Jr. History - World)

(7th-8th); Sarah Huff,  Full year; Tuesday 11-12:30 ($325/semester)

This introductory survey course is designed to compare and analyze a chronological study of cultures from 8000 bce to the present in order to familiarize ourselves with our global world. Our approach, which is based on UCLA's World History for Us All, will cover such topics as cultural and intellectual developments, the impact of interaction with other societies, and systems of social and gender structure that will help us define our role in the greater part of humanity. Primary source readings, historian-based research and some fictional works will be used.

45.083 World History:  Love and Death before the Age of 30 -  The Struggle for Human Survival and - Man's search for the perfect government. (Sr. History - World)

(9th-12th); Sarah Huff, 1st Semester: Tuesday 2-3:30 ($325/semester)

This is a fast-paced, two-semester history course in which students explore the inter-connectedness of humans, our symbiotic relationship with our environment and most importantly the events and ideas that have shaped our global world. Who we are and where we have been are two of the profound thematic structures of this class. We'll attempt to answer several profound questions  through analysis and interpreting the evidence of our human past. Over-arching themes include -- The Human Struggle for Survival  and Heroes and Villains that shaped our way of thinking.


45.083 World History:  Absolutism to Communism - Man's search for the perfect government.  (Sr. History - World)

(9th-12th); Sarah Huff, 2nd semester; Tuesday 2-3:30 ($325/semester)

Taken as a continuation of the first semester or as an independent course, this segment covers political and cultural movements and revolutions that have impacted our world. Students will read  primary sources, historian-based reference material such as Bill Bryson's “History of Nearly Everything,” and “Guns, Germs and Steel,” by Jared DiaMondayd, and excerpts from historical fiction. Knowledge of geographyics  helpful, and the willingness to think is required!  2nd semester; Tuesday 2-3:30 ($325/semester)

45.083 Ancient History (Sr. History - Ancient)

(9th-12th); Kendall Howes, (not offered this year)

This course is similar to a college approach to studying the classics. Through detailed analysis of ancient sources, we will examine the philosophy, religion, politics and art of Greco-Roman, Egyptian and Eastern cultures. By focusing the class on specific topics and projects, students will learn how to analyze and interpret the impact that ancient culture has had on the modern world. The class is discussion and lecture based with students actively involved in developing presentations, group collaboration and creative expression.


45.0812 American History:  American Culture Through Film (Sr. History - American) 

(10th-12th); Dr Barton Palmer, 1st semester; seminar Friday 2:30-4:00 with viewing and discussions Monday 8-11 (Section A) or  Tuesday 2:00-4:30 (Section B) ($375 per semester)

We usually think of Hollywood providing us with entertainment, but at their best commercial films have much to teach us about our shared national history, including the difficult and provocative cultural issues we face.  In this course, we will view and discuss a number of films that ask key questions about what exactly it means to be an American.  These films will offer us ideal starting points for in-depth explorations of these questions, which include race (slavery, the treatment of native Americans and Hispanics, the problems faced by immigrants), class (the exploitation of agricultural and manufacturing workers), and gender (the unequal status of women, the restrictions of social roles for both genders).  We will be using a textbook (Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States) that avoids the simplifying patriotic narrative of most classroom texts.

45.0812 American History:  Social Values and Politics Through Film (Sr. History - American)

(10th-12th); Dr Barton Palmer, 2nd semester; seminar Friday 2:30-4:00 with viewing and discussions Monday 8-11 (Section A) or Tuesday 2:00-4:30 (Section B) ($375 per semester)

The second semester of this course will focus on more narrowly political questions, including those associated with armed conflict (the Civil War, the Vietnam War) and with our political system.

45.061 Economics (Sr. Economics)

(11th-12th); Marc Porlier, 1st semester; Monday and Wednesday 12:30-1:30 ($350)

The iPhone is a wonder of modern technology. The basic materials for this gadget are mined from all corners of the earth, shipped to factories in several different countries, assembled by technicians, and distributed through myriad channels of marketing, transportation, and retail sales outlets. Miners, refiners, manufacturers, sailors, truckers, pilots, engineers, technicians, salespeople, and numerous others act in concert to transform natural resources into this "must-have" consumer good without a central planner or project plan. This course will investigate how these spontaneous interactions can arise through a price-coordinated economy. Students will learn the basic concepts of micro- and macro-economics taught in college courses. While the subject will be taught from a classical, free market perspective, other economic schools of thought will be introduced. Class participation will include formal debates on the economic effects of price controls, market regulation, taxes, and anti-trust laws. Students will start to learn the subject through an understanding of the economics of Robinson Crusoe, alone on an island. By the end of the semester, students will have a better understanding of their own roles as consumers, employees, entrepreneurs, and citizens. They will also have a solid grasp of government economic policy and will be able to explain the causes of our current economic contraction.

45.061 AP Psychology (Sr. AP Psychology)

(10th-12th); Ann Fortenberry, Friday 11:15-12:45 ($350)

The purpose of the Advanced Placement Psychology course is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students will also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. The course will provide instruction in empirically supported psychological facts, research findings, terminology, and associated phenomena, perspectives and major figures (Piaget, Erikson, Skinner, Bandura, Freud, etc.).  Topics of study will include biological bases of behavior, lifespan development, states of consciousness, memory, sensation and perception, intelligence, motivaton and emotion, personality, treatment of psychological disorders and social psychology. AP Psychology is equivalent to an introductory college survey course. Students will have the option of taking the AP Exam in May in order to try to earn college credit.  Classes will consist of discussion and activities that reinforce the concepts in the textbook, . Psychology – Eight Edition by David G. Myers. 

45.058 Introduction to Ethics (Sr. Ethics)

(9th-11th); (not offered this year)

Course Objective: The course will focus on theory (the history of ethics in academia) and practice (how to make ethical decisions).  Each student will explore competing world views of ethical thinking and behavior and deduce a workable framework of their own.  Required Textbook:    How Good People Make Tough Choices: Resolving the Dilemmas of Ethical Living; Rushworth M. Kidder. Course Format:    The class will consist of lectures and student-led case studies. Students are expected to prepare for class by reading assigned topics in the class textbook.

Science Department

 Science Olympiad (Science Olympiad)

(6th – 9th ); Ann Seay, Tuesday 1:00-2:30 ($25 lab fee/semester. If not enrolled in a science class, there is also a $200 class fee for the Science Olympiad lab session per semester)

Competition is integrated into the regular science classes and provides the laboratory segment of the junior high courses, enabling all students the ability to prepare for and compete in a regional Science Olympiad tournament with the possibility of advancing to state and national levels. The mission of the national science Olympiad is to promote and improve student interest in science and to improve the quality of k-12 science education throughout the nation. The events change each year, but all events are designed with an emphasis on problem solving and hands-on, minds-on constructivist learning practices.  Students can view descriptions of the events from the 2007/2008 school year at the following web address: http://www.aug.edu/gaso/6-9.html. Students wishing to be involved in Science Olympiad who are not registered for science classes may take 1-4 of the lab sessions of the classes. 9th graders enrolled in a high school science class may take these lab sessions at no charge; 

 Introduction to Rocketry and Rocket Competition Team (Rocket Team)

(7th-12th) Ann Seay, Meeting time TBA ($250 plus material fees)

The goal of this class is to introduce students to the history of rocketry and the scientific principles of rocket design.  In this “hands on” course, the students design, build and fly their own rockets in competition with other schools.  The Team America Rocketry Challenge (TARC) is the world's largest rocket contest, sponsored by the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA) and the National Association of Rocketry (NAR). It was created in the fall of 2002 as a one-time celebration of the Centennial of Flight, but the enthusiasm about the event was so great that AIA and NAR were asked to hold the contest annually.

Approximately 7,000 students from across the nation compete in TARC each year. Teams design, build and fly a model rocket that reaches a specific altitude and duration determined by a set of rules developed each year. The current goal is to design, build and fly a one-stage model rocket to an altitude of 750 feet, keep it aloft for 45 seconds, and return 2 raw eggs unbroken. The contest is designed to encourage students to study math and science and pursue careers in aerospace. The top 100 teams, based on local qualification flights, are invited to Washington, DC in May for the national finals. Prizes include $60,000 in cash and scholarships split between the top 10 finishers.


Jr High Science: The Human Body and Genetics with lab (Jr. Science - Biology) – 1st semester
Earth Science and Meteorology (Jr. Science - Earth Science) – 2nd semester

(6th-7th); Lisa White Thursday 1-2:30 ($275 plus $25 lab fee/semester)

Introduces students to human body systems, their interactions with one another, and how disorders and other factors effect the health of body systems; discover answers to questions such as why do we get pimples, why do our feet stink, why do we burp, what causes vomiting, and much more. This class will also cover the mysteries of genetics and heredity -- discover why some people have blue eyes and others have brown; why some people can curl their tongues but others cannot; why only some people can taste certain things, and much more. This very hands-on and visually-based science class meets all the academic standards while engaging students in discussions, experiments and presentations.

 Jr High Science: Astronomy with lab (Jr. Science - Astronomy) – 1st semester
Biology and Ecology (Jr. Science - Ecology) – 2nd semester

(7th-8th) Freya Fitzpatrick, Tuesday, Thursday 1-2:30 ($350 plus $25 lab fee/semester)

An introduction to ancient and current models of the universe. Studies include gravity, the moon, star maps, planetary characteristics and astrophysics. The class includes an  exploration of how astronomical objects produce various phenomena—such as weather and tides. Students are also introduced to the technology of the telescope, satellite imaging, rocketry. Discussions will surround shuttle missions, future space travel and NASA. Physical science is included as a means to measuring, analysis and creating hypotheses.
Second half considers the relationship of living things to each other and to their environment which physical properties like climate and soil. This course will consider biomes, also known as ecosystems. Because of its focus on the organization of life on earth and the relationship between organisms and their environment, ecology draws on many other branches of science. For this reason, ecology is often considered to be a holistic science and includes the interaction of abiotic and biotic factors, characteristics of populations, the flow of energy, and the cycling of matter.

 26.012 Biology with Labs (Sr. Biology)

(9th-12th) Dr Michael McGinnis (Dr McGene) Thursday 11:00-1:00 (section A) and 1:00-3:15 (section B) and  includes lab ($350 plus $50 lab fee/semester)

This is a high school level biology course that focuses on understanding the cell structure of organisms and the development of the classification system. Topics cover genetics which includes the role of DNA and RNA, Mendelian genetics and meiosis, and  Ecology which examines adaption of plants and animals to their environment and the recycling of nutrients. This course will also delve into the controversial theories of evolution and intelligent design, favoring neither approach in explaining the development and selection of species. Students will read independent articles on the debate and be encouraged to understand the foundations and tenants of each. This course includes weekly labs, several dissections, and practice in writing lab reports, giving presentations, and learning material through a combination of lecture, readings and scientific discovery.

40.051 Chemistry with Labs (Sr. Chemistry)

(9th-12th); Lisa White, Prerequisite: Algebra I, Friday 1:00-2:30 with additional lab and study group Tuesday 1-2 ($350 plus $50 lab fee/semester). This class runs through the mini-session.

This course is a college preparatory Chemistry class. Students  study matter using a course produced by Georgia Public Broadcasting and written by our  instructor. Students are able to view videos on the GPB website and also download and print most class notes and worksheets. The videos and class notes serve as the textbook for this class. Topics covered include: matter; atomic theory; the periodic table; bonding; chemical formulas and equations; mass relationships in a compound; toichiometry; gas laws; solutions; acids, bases, and salts; reaction rates and equilibrium; thermochemistry; electrochemistry; and nuclear chemistry.  By completing this course through diligent study, students will be prepared to take AP Chemistry or chemistry in college.

40.081 Physics with Labs (Sr. Physics)

(9th-12th);  Derek Owens, Prerequisite:  Algebra I, Friday 1:00-2:30 ($350plus $50 lab fee/semester ) which runs through the mini session ; labs on Tuesday 10-11 ($100 plus $50 lab fee/semester)

This course is a high school physics course with lab exercises. It will cover the topics normally covered in a high school physics. This course is one of the three core high school science classes: Physics, Chemistry, and Biology.  Topics covered include: scientific notation, significant figures, speed, velocity, vectors, accelerated motion equations, Newton’s laws of motion, Energy, Circular motion, Law of universal gravity, planetary orbits, optics, circuits, Ohm’s law, magnetism, motors and power.

26.073 Anatomy and Physiology with lab (Sr. Anatomy)

(11th-12th); Daniel Sheerer, Monday 1:30-3:00 and Wednesday 1:30-2:30 ($350 plus $50 lab fee/semester) The Wednesday class runs through the mini-session.

This course provides a basic understanding of the normal structure and function of the human body.  Topics detail mapping the development and physiology of each organ system. This course prepares students for further studies in the wellness, therapeutic, sports science and healthcare professions.  It provides more detailed answers to the questions, “What specifically are my guts?” “What’s the difference between a muscle, tendon, fascia and ligament?” and “What happens when I experience that fight or flight adrenaline feeling?”  It also allows the student to make better decisions regarding personal health. Students will acquire team building, problem solving, communication and critical thinking skills through group work. Course outcomes include the ability to define anatomical and physiological terms of the human body; identify body systems and related structures of the human body and analyze the effects of abnormal functions on body systems on the body as a whole.

17.011 Health

(9th-12th); Ann Seay, (not offered this year)

This class meets the state requirement for one semester of High School Health.   Students will have the opportunity to take Red Cross Infant, Child and adult CPR and First Aid (additional cost to Red Cross Instructor). Students have the opportunity to take ADAP (Alcohol, Drug Awareness Program) required by the state in order to obtain a driver’s license.  Textbook for this course is Focus on Health ISBN 0-07-246735-5.  
 

World Languages

 61.041 Latin 1 (Latin 1)

(7th-12th); Freya Fitzpatrick, Full Year, Tuesday and Thursday 9-10 ($325 per semester)

Latin 1 is a year long course consisting of chapters 1-20 of Wheelock’s Latin which actively involves students in the reading of classical Latin beginning with the first lesson. The course covers 1st-4th declension nouns and adjectives and the active and passive voices of the indicative mood of all tenses of the four verb conjugations. Students will develop a knowledge of Latin roots in English words. Through independent projects they will learn the basics of Roman culture, geography, history and civilization. This course will prepare students for the first year level of the National Latin Exam. Through this class, students will develop skills in reasoning, analysis and deductive thinking. Textbooks: Wheelock, Frederic M. Wheelock’s Latin.  6th ed.  New York: Harper Collins, 2005, and  Comeau, Paul T., LaFleur, Richard A. Workbook for Wheelock's Latin, 3rd ed. New York: Harper Collins, 2000. Students will prepare for the National Latin exam.

61.042 Latin II (Latin 2)

(6th-12th); Freya Fitzpatrick , Full Year, Weds and Friday 9-10 ($325 per semester)


This course uses Ecce Romani  which actively involves students in the reading of classical Latin beginning. Each class will include discussions about the culture and influence of Rome as well as weekly exercises in vocabulary, grammar and translations. Through this class, students will develop skills in reasoning, analysis and deductive thinking. Students will prepare for the National Latin exam. Textbook: G. Lawall, R. Palma, and D. Perry. Ecce Romani II. 2nd ed. White Plains, N.Y., Longman, 1998.

60.071 Spanish I  (Spanish 1)

(6th-12th); Rebecca Benzaquen, Full Year, Tuesday and Thursday 11:00-12:00 ($325 per semester)

Students are given a basic understanding of the Spanish language through listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction. Emphasis is placed on learning through reading and writing in Spanish.


60.072 Spanish II (Spanish 2)

(6th-12th); Rebecca Benzaquen, Full Year, Tuesday and Thursday 9:00-10:00 ($325 per semester)

The purpose of this course is to further the students' conversational, reading and writing skills in Spanish. In addition to new vocabulary, the past tense and other useful grammatical points will be covered. As in the first course, there is great emphasis on developing the students' speaking, reading and writing abilities. The students will create their own dialogues on specified topics, and will be responsible for several readings.


60.073 Spanish III (Spanish 3)

(6th-12th); Rebecca Benzaquen, Tuesday and Thursday 10:00-11:00 ($325 per semester)

This course provides a continuation of Spanish II with an emphasis on the fundamentals of Spanish structure in written and oral communication. Readings give students a panoramic view of the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking people


60.011 French I (French 1)

(6th-12th); Fabienne Nichols, Full Year, Tuesday and Thursday 9-10 ($325 per semester)

Grammar, composition, conversation, and reading, with emphasis on conversation. Students are taught to identify, describe, and characterize people, objects, places, and events; Students will be able to give information and instruction, form questions ,and issue simple commands and requests. Vocabulary includes words dealing with the immediate context of daily experience.


60.012 French II (French 2)

(6th-12th); Fabienne Nichols, Full Year, Tues and Thurs  10-11 ($325 per semester)

Speaking and writing in French about past and future events; telling a story (narrating and describing the past), promising, predicting, and proposing simple hypotheses and conjectures.

Fine Arts Department

50.0311 Visual Arts (Sr Studio Art)

(9th-12th); Ben Mueller, Weds 10:30-12:00 (Section A)($250 per semester includes materials)

This is an introductory hands on studio class which covers several aspects of art including drawing, multi-media and sculpting. The course allows the student to discover the techniques and processes involved in these elements of expression while having fun and developing an expressive style.


50.0311 Visual Arts (Jr Studio Art)

(6th-8th); Ben Mueller, Weds 1:30-3:00 (Section A)($250 per semester includes materials)

This is an introductory hands on studio class which covers several aspects of art including painting, drawing, multi-media and sculpting. The course allows the student to discover the techniques and processes involved in these elements of expression while having fun and developing an expressive style.


50.0311 Visual Arts (Sr Studio Art)

(6th-12th), Charlene Shikany, Monday 12:30-1:45 (Section B) ($250 per semester includes materials)

This is an introductory painting class. The course allows the student to discover the techniques and processes involved in these elements of expression while having fun and developing an expressive style.
Broadway Singing

53.0711 Choral Ensemble (Chorus-Broadway)

(6th-12th);  Mindy Carter,
Monday 2:00-3:00 (Section B) ($160 per semester)

Broadway Singing - Description Forthcoming

53.0711 Choral Ensemble (Chorus-Jazz)

(6th-12th);  Prisca Strother,
Wednesday 3:00-4:00 (Section A) ($160 per semester)

Not your typical high school chorus or church choir. This class is led by jazz singer, Prisca Strother, who toured in a capella jazz groups throughout the UK and is a recording artist here in Atlanta. This class will focus on vocal dynamics to create a cutting edge performance group. You do not need to be an accomplished singer to participate. The class is all about learning to sing while working as an ensemble to develop original harmonies and contemporary performances.

36.023 Introduction to Dance: Hip-Hop and Jazz (6th-12th) (Dance - Hip Hop)

TBA, Wednesday 12:30-1:30 ($160 per semester)

This class will cover jazz fundamentals for the beginning jazz dancer, but will be taught at an intermediate level. While some students have no prior dance training, others will have several years of experience. Students will advance with their own ability levels through center work & progressions

36.026 Introduction to Dance - Ballroom and Salsa (Dance - Ballroom)

Monday 11:00-12:00 ($160 per semester)

Taught by a professional internationally acclaimed dancer, this is an engaging and fun class which covers most of the social dances including salsa, swing, hip hop, tango and tap. Students not only have fun while learning these dances, they are also exposed to ballroom etiquette, and they quickly become comfortable in formal social  situations. A great confidence builder while polishing up on rhythm, style and foot work.

Jr. High Dramatic Arts - Acting (Jr. Intro to Acting)

(6th-8th)  Karen Howes and Brooke Collins, Friday 1:15-2:30 ($200 per semester)

This class combines work in voice, diction, physicality, character development, scene study and improvisation to help develop the young actor’s ability to create believable and interesting characters, environments and situations. This is a non-academic class which may require outside work in memorizing, writing, or analyzing scripted scenes. The course focuses on acting skills and technique, but also provides a good deal of class time developing focus, awareness and mental alertness. Actors are also able to perform in several shows presented to the public throughout the year.    For more information on Young Actor's Ensemble, go to www.youngactorsensemble.org.

52.061 Dramatic Arts - Acting I (Sr. Intro to Acting)

(6th-8th)  Karen Howes and Brooke Collins, Monday 1:45-3:00 for 8th-12th ($220 per semester)


This class combines work in voice, diction, physicality, character development, scene study and improvisation to help develop the young actor’s ability to create believable and interesting characters, environments and situations. This is a non-academic class which may require outside work in memorizing, writing, or analyzing scripted scenes. The course focuses on acting skills and technique, but also provides a good deal of class time developing focus, awareness and mental alertness. Actors are also able to perform in several shows presented to the public throughout the year.    For more information on Young Actor's Ensemble, go to www.youngactorsensemble.org.

52.062 Dramatic Arts - Acting II (Sr. Dramatic Arts)

(9th-12th or permission of instructor)   Karen Howes, Wednesdays 1:00-3:00 ($200 per semester)

This course is for seasoned performers and continues work done in the Introduction to Acting class.  Permission of the instructor is required to enroll in this class.  Technique in Meisner, Adler, Chekov and Strasburg. Students may enroll in both acting classes for a reduced fee.  This class includes scene study and audition techniques. For more information on Young Actor's Ensemble, go to www.youngactorsensemble.org.



52.061 Improvisation and Acting (Improv and Acting)

(6th-12th)  Jay Starr, Weds 2:30-4:00 ($200 per semester)

This class is for anyone regardless of experience as it is designed to provide a good foundation in Keith Johnstone's school of improvisation. This course teaches vital story telling skills and is applicable for all types of students whether you want to be a performer, a writer, a better reader or just have a lot of fun.. After this class students begin to watch movies and read stories in a different way by deconstructing the elements and seeing the process the writer is using. This class also teaches valuable techniques in status, complicity, being "in the moment" and spontaneity. It is the intent of this class to provide a fun, supportive and relaxed environment.

52.011 Dramatic Arts I (Dramatic Arts - Film)

(6th-12th)  Meghan Baxter, Wednesdays 10:30-12:00 ($200 per semester)

This course will give students an opportunity to further develop and refine their skills as actors. Professional acting for film, television and video requires  specific training. Emphasis will be on strengthening concentration; developing  imagination and increasing believability. There will be techniques offered that include acting and improvisation through the Meisner Method. Students will also learn to maintain strong character within imaginary circumstance. Self development and a wholistic approach are part of this comprehensive training. Students will do some television and film script work and experience living truthfully in front of the camera. monologues and scene study will also be part of this course. For more information please see www.claritysprings.com and  click on Theater.

Rock and Roll Jam Session (Jam Session)

student led:  Friday 1:15-2:30 (Sr. Jam Session) and Weds 2:45-3:45 (all grades); no fee for students taking classes; $50/semester for students not taking another class.

While this is a student-based class, those involved are serious musicians who have an interest in working with other teens to develop group jamming skills, develop original songs and experiment with new forms of rhythm and instrumentation. There is a Jr. high and high school session. High school students may join either. Students bring their own instruments.

Electives Department

45.059 Peer Leadership Training  (Sr. Leadership)

(10th-12th); TBA

Learn and practice leadership skills.  In addition to formal training, students have opportunities to practice these skills during school activities. 

7.4421 Advanced Computer Technology - 3D Animation (Sr. 3D Animation)

(8-12); Jessica Henley, There is a limit of 8-10 for this class. Friday 11:15-1:00 ($300)
  

This class enables students to create 3D characters, objects and textures  by learning the Maya animation software which was used to make Shrek and Flushed Away. The software is the industry standard and is the primary animation system used by college students at SCAD, NYU, USC and dozens of other art and film schools across the country. Instruction includes teaching students to create walk and run cycles and how to match vocal recordings to their characters. Students will be given computers to work on but it’s recommended that students bring laptops so they can continue their creations at home. This class will move faster and cover more material than the Jr. class.

Common Cent$:  Know Your Money! (Common Cents)

(6th-8th); Michelle Stinson, Not offered this semester ($200 per semester)

This is an introduction to personal finance for teens.  The course introduces important money management concepts to empower teens, and  it encourages students to maintain a personal expense journal to help them become conscious consumers.  The goal of this course is to empower teens to spend wisely, budget properly, save intentionally, and understand credit
Public Speaking

Public Speaking (Public Speaking)

(6th-12th); TBD Thursday 11-12:15 ($200 per semester plus material fees)

Description Forthcoming

Fashion Historical Elements, Design, and the Runway

(6th-12th); Christine Seelye-King, Mondays from 10:30-12:00 ($200 plus $50 material fees per semester)

Students will learn the fundamentals of sewing by working with patterns, and they will learn how to sketch and design their own original clothes. Students will also learn about different textiles and how to shop and select material. There will be occasional outings to Hancock Fabrics which is one block from the school. Students will be provided with sewing machines to use in class. The class will conclude with a fashion show.

35.066 SAT/ACT Prep (Sr. SAT Prep)

(9th-12th)  Ann Seay, Minimal homework. Wednesday 12:30-1:30 (Section A) or 1:30-2:30 (Section B) , or Friday 9:00-10:00 (Section C) ($200)

First semester we will focus on the verbal sections of the test.    Each class, students will at take a 20 minute section of one of these tests, followed by a review of the answers and strategies that will help the students select the correct answers. Textbook for the course will be Gruber's Complete SAT Guide. Second semester will focus on math tricks.

Junior High Standardized Test Prep (Jr. SAT Prep)

(6th-8th)  Ann Seay, Tuesday 9:00-10:00 (Section C)  or  Weds from 9:00-10:00 (Section B) or Thursday 10:00-11:00 (Section A)  ($200)

This course begin to teach students the skills required for standardized testing.  Many of our middle school students will be taking the SAT /ACT through the Duke Tip Program and others will be take the SSAT.  This course focuses on the easier math questions (since most of the students will not have completed Algebra and Geometry). Instruction also includes the vocabulary and verbal skills needed to score well on these tests. Students will become thoroughly familiar with the format and strategies needed to score high on these standardized tests.


Tutoring

Contact: Ann Seay for pricing 

Tutoring is available for all students. Those registered with Pierian Springs receive a discount on tutoring services. Students are also able to take independent studies in subjects not offered at the school or at times in convenient for the student and his family.  


70.22 Internships (Sr. Internship)

(9th-12th) Ann Seay, Karen Howes

Internships are academic electives used in local systems when the high school's regular course offerings are insufficient to meet the needs of the most academically able and most highly motivated students. School employees assist individual gifted students in securing positions in a professional workplace where they can pursue advanced academic knowledge and skills in areas of interest. The learning objectives of the internship are developed jointly by the student and the school. An individual student contract is reviewed and approved. The student contract must include specific learning goals and objectives, a plan for achieving the objectives, a proposal for a final project or product, a plan for professional presentation of the product, and the criteria by which the product will be evaluated.

Sports and Fitness

   

36.011 General Physical Education - Individual Sport - Fencing

(6th-12th) John Terris Both semesters; Wednesday 9:00-10:30 ($200 per semester)

In this beginner’s class, students are taught basic fencing footwork, blade work and terminology. The class engages in fencing exercises and games which build speed and agility for this mental sport. There will be opportunities to attend local tournaments to watch fencers compete at various levels.  Equipment will be provided for the first semester, then students will purchase their own.

36.011 General Physical Education - Individual Sport - Yoga  (Yoga)

(6th-12th); TBA, Monday 10:00-11:00 ($200 per semester)

Get fit, get centered and have fun!    Yoga is great exercise - a total body workout that increases flexibility, builds strength and improves balance.    It is also much more than just good exercise - as you gain control over your body, you'll also be developing control over your mind; learning how to stay relaxed  and centered (even when life gets stormy!)  Come join the fun - no experience necessary, just bring an open mind and a positive attitude.

36.024 Intro to Aquatic Sports: Swimming (Swimming)

Independent Study - Ann Seay ($100)

Course uses materials developed by Brigham Young University.

Welcome to intermediate swimming! This course is designed to help you improve your swimming techniques and to establish a lifetime goal of being fit. Since the Industrial Revolution, life has changed rapidly. With the inventions of the automobile, machinery, and computers, life has definitely become less physically demanding, yet it still tends to be very stressful.

Swimming is a way to relieve stress and just feel good. Because swimming uses a variety of muscles, it helps to tone the body, keep your heart in great shape, and maintain good health. With a consistent workout of five days a week, your entire life will be better — not only will you improve your physical condition, but you will be strengthened mentally, spiritually, and emotionally.

I invite you to enjoy this course and to have a blast! There is nothing better than enjoying what you do — have fun!


36.032 Intro to Sports – Bowling (Bowling)

Independent Study - Ann Seay ($100)


Course uses materials developed by Brigham Young University. Physical activities you can engage in during a major portion of your life can be positive influences for good health, recreational pursuits, physical conditioning, and social engagements. Bowling is one activity that has immeasurable value if care is taken to learn the skills necessary for a personally satisfying performance. Motivated people of all ages can bowl. If you can walk a straight line and swing your arms backward and forward, you have the potential for developing a lifetime activity of bowling. Many physically handicapped persons have become good bowlers by making adaptations according to their physical needs. Bowling has become so widespread and popular throughout the country that commercial bowling alleys can be found in nearly every community.

The lessons in this course manual are designed to provide information that will allow you to learn bowling skills without the aid of an instructor. The material is presented in a logical order so that important information will provide the background necessary for you to analyze your own performance. All lessons require that you submit an assignment to Independent Study. At the conclusion of the course, you should be knowledgeable about bowling, have attained the "advanced beginner" skill level, and be motivated to practice and reach the level of skill necessary for a lifetime of enjoyable participation.

36.023 Introduction to Dance: Hip-Hop and Jazz (6th-12th) (Dance - Hip Hop)

TBA, Weds 12:30-1:30 ($200 per semester)

Description Forthcoming  

36.026 Introduction to Dance - Ballroom and Salsa (Dance - Ballroom)

Weds 1:30-2:30 (Section A) and Friday 2:30-3:30 ($200 per semester)

Taught by a professional internationally acclaimed dancer, this is an engaging and fun class which covers most of the social dances including salsa, swing, hip hop, tango and tap. Students not only have fun while learning these dances, they are also exposed to ballroom etiquette, and they quickly become comfortable in formal social  situations. A great confidence builder while polishing up on rhythm, style and foot work.

Ultimate Frisbee Team

Kendall Howes, cost TBD

Ultimate relies upon a spirit of sportsmanship that places the responsibility for fair play on the player. Highly competitive play is encouraged, but never at the expense of mutual respect among competitors, adherence to the agreed upon rules, or the basic joy of play. Protection of these vital elements serves to eliminate unsportsmanlike conduct from the Ultimate field. Such actions as taunting opposing players, dangerous aggression, belligerent intimidation, intentional infractions, or other 'win-at-all-costs' behavior are contrary to the Spirit of the Game and must be avoided by all players. The Pierian Springs Ultimate team is part of the Atlanta Flying Disc Club and is organized to compete against other schools and teams in the Atlanta area.

Clubs and Teams

Jr. National Honor Society

TBD, Full Time Students only Fee: Cost of Pins and any club expenses

Jr National Honor Society (selection process): The National Honor Society, or NHS, is a nationwide organization in the United States and consists of many chapters in high schools (grades 9-12). Selection is based on four criteria: service, leadership, scholarship and character. The NHS requires some sort of service to the community, school, or other organizations. The projects help students meet the required service hour total monthly. The National Honor Society was founded in 1921 by the National Association of Secondary School Principals.

Sr. National Honor Society

TBD, ull Time Students only Fee: Cost of Pins and any club expenses

Sr National Honor Society (selection process): The National Honor Society, or NHS, is a nationwide organization in the United States and consists of many chapters in high schools (grades 9-12). Selection is based on four criteria: service, leadership, scholarship and character. The NHS requires some sort of service to the community, school, or other organizations. The projects help students meet the required service hour total monthly. The National Honor Society was founded in 1921 by the National Association of Secondary School Principals.

Jr. International Thespian Honor Society

TBD, Full Time Students only Fee: $22 National Fee plus Cost of Pins and any club expenses

Jr. International Thespian Honor Society (Drama Honor Society - selection process): The International Thespian Society is an honorary organization for high-school and middle-school theatre students located at more than 3,600 affiliated secondary schools across the United States, Canada, and abroad. The mission of ITS is to honor student excellence in the theater arts; its motto is, "Act well thy part; there all the honor lies."

Sr. International Thespian Honor Society

TBD, Full Time Students only Fee: $22 National Fee plus Cost of Pins and any club expenses

Sr. International Thespian Honor Society(Drama Honor Society - selection process): The International Thespian Society is an honorary organization for high-school and middle-school theatre students located at more than 3,600 affiliated secondary schools across the United States, Canada, and abroad. The mission of ITS is to honor student excellence in the theater arts; its motto is, "Act well thy part; there all the honor lies."

Sr. History Club

TBD, Full Time Students only. Fee: Cost of Activities

History Club Members will create projects for the National History Day competition as well as enjoy other activities as selected by the members.

Jr. History Club

TBD, Full Time Students only. Fee: Cost of Activities

History Club Members will create projects for the National History Day competition as well as enjoy other activities as selected by the members.

World Languages Club

TBD, Full Time Students only. Fee: Cost of Activities

Practice speaking your language, learn about other languages. We will explore non-English speaking cultures and cuisine.

Rocket Club

Ann Seay, $350 per year. Fee: Cost of Supplies

Rocket Competition Team: This club will prepare an entry for the Team America Rocket Competition. Meeting time will be scheduled based on the schedules of interested students. Weekend and afterschool meetings will be necessary.

Ultimate Frisbee Team

Kendall Howes, cost TBD

Ultimate relies upon a spirit of sportsmanship that places the responsibility for fair play on the player. Highly competitive play is encouraged, but never at the expense of mutual respect among competitors, adherence to the agreed upon rules, or the basic joy of play. Protection of these vital elements serves to eliminate unsportsmanlike conduct from the Ultimate field. Such actions as taunting opposing players, dangerous aggression, belligerent intimidation, intentional infractions, or other 'win-at-all-costs' behavior are contrary to the Spirit of the Game and must be avoided by all players. The Pierian Springs Ultimate team is part of the Atlanta Flying Disc Club and is organized to compete against other schools and teams in the Atlanta area.

Community Service Club

TBD, Cost of Activities

Activites to be determined by members of the club
Newspaper

Newspaper Club

Pierian Springs publishes its own monthly newspaper which includes student writing and photography.

FLIGHT
contact Karen Howes or Linda Cahill

Varsity, Jr Varsity and MS teams organized to compete against private schools in the Atlanta area. Offers highly competitive sports in basketball, golf, volleyball and cross country track. The Boys Varsity team finished 15th in the Nationals last year and the JV team held a season record of 26-0. Girls JV were also undefeated.

January Mini-Session

45.082 Georgia History (6th-9th)  (Mini-Georia History)

Ann Seay,  Tuesday and Thursday  10-3 ($400 includes transportation and activity fees; the overnite trip may be extra)

This "walking tour of Georgia History" will include field trips to historical sites in the area as well as possibly an overnight trip.  We will visit the Tellis Science Museum to learn about Georgia's geological history and follow the Chieftain's trail to sites including the Chief Van House, the Chieftain's Museum, Etawah Indian Mounds, the Funk Heritage Center and New Echota, the first capital of the Cherokee Nation.  We will tour civil war battle sites, Kennesaw National Battlefield National Park,  Bulloch Hall, The Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History and them move into more recent history by visiting the Sate Capital, the Martin Luther King Center and the Carter Museum.  Students will photograph their travels and create a multimedia "History of Georgia".

7.4421 Advanced Computer Technology - Video Game Design (Mini - Video Game Design)

(6th-12th); Jessica Henley, Monday and Wednesday 10-3 ($300)

Description forthcoming

6.417 Entrepreneurship - Starting Your Own Business (Mini - Entrepreneurship)

(8th-12th); Tuesday and Thursday Jan 4-29 ($300)

The objective of this course is to teach students how to develop a business. The students will research their industry of choice, study competition, study feasibility and develop a business plan. The course will culminate in a formal presentation of their business plans to classmates and guests playing the role of potential investors/ lenders.

52.051 Dramatic Arts - Advanced Drama I (Mini - Acting)

(9th-12th) Karen Howes and Brooke Collins Hamilton, Permission of instructor required.
Monday and Wednesday 10:00-4:00; Tuesday 1:00-4:00, and  a weekend retreat.  Performances Jan 30 at 8 pm and Jan 31st at 3 PM ($320 includes 4 tickets to the show; plus an additional $100-$150 for the  trip which is also charged to fulltime students) Space is very limited for this mini-session option; students taking acting or voice classes are given priority.


This ensemble of actors may choose to do a “broadway” musical or create an original play. We will spend four weeks rehearsing and one weekend performing at a local theater. If we do an original play, we will tour it to area schools. This will be a small cast show (under 15); in which members of the cast participate in all aspects of the production including writing, costumes, props, set, and publicity. This is an intense and fun way to put on a show. We will meet for 50-70 hours  during the session.

52.041 Dramatic Arts/Technical Theater I (Mini - Technical Theater)


(7th-12th) Maureen  Ehbeck, Thursday 10-4 and Tuesday 9:30-12:00 ($300)

This class will work in conjunction with the Theatrical production class as students will create, design and make costumes for the January production. Students will learn how to measure and fit models, create designs within a budget and shop and select the best materials and accessories for costuming. The mini session will also include a history of costuming and trends in the field. Students enrolled in this class may also be involved in the play.

Symbolic Logic

(8th-12th); Myrricia Holmann

This course focuses on mathematical logic and its connection to electrical engineering. Students will learn the basics of symbolic logic, will develop skills in logic proofs, and will then apply this knowledge to related topics including digital circuit design. Students will work with a breadboard to understand the fundamental behavior of 5 basic logic gates and will work with software (a digital logic simulator) to create introductory logic circuits. As time permits, students will also study logical fallacies and will analyze arguments by identifying faulty reasoning.